Mar 4, 2014

A Legacy Landscape.

Transitioning long fallowed fields to woodland pasture, perennial crops, and orchards requires a multi-layered agro-ecosystem design.  After extensive site assessment accounting for climate, soil ecology, geology and existing ecological systems, we start by building low impact access to the functional spaces on the site and then develop water catchment systems for drought proofing.  

Client objectives and goals are integrated into a new agro-ecology with over yielding and  multi-seasonal harvests, This is  required to support the stewards of the land and the ecosystem that supports them.   Plant selection is based on using species most suited to the climate and soils. Many of the plants are chosen because they build soil structure, provide beneficial habitat, and fertility supporting the anchor plants which are harvested for human consumption. Nutrients and organic matter is cycled back into the soil to maintain and build soil life.  The landscape is now diverse and rich with habitat.  It is an integrated forest garden, complete with small livestock to collect and spread nutrients across the landscape. A legacy landscape.

1 comment:

Daniel Halsey said...

Heading out to install NW corner March 24-25. Frost line provided.

Permaculture and Polyculture Consulting and Design

Permaculture and Polyculture Consulting and Design
Getting to know your property, the plants you have and those you can grow, is a fulfilling endeavor. With most I am the steward of the land. I give them good soil biology and they do the rest. If I group them in cohesive plant communities, they respond with greater yields. If I encourage the micro-organisms (Fungus and bacteria) , the roots obsorb more nutrients making a pest and disease resistant plant. A stronger plant that gives us more organic food and takes less energy.

A Ten Acre Farm Transformed to an Edible Forest Garden

A Ten Acre Farm Transformed to an Edible Forest Garden
Self Renewing Fertility, Soil Building, Water Catchment, Tea Trail Swale, Erosion Control and Native American Medicinals