Jul 26, 2010

Sharing and Caring starts with the Earth.

Keeping with Ethic and Principal of Permaculture we need to attend to the Earth first. Returning the fertility we remove with edibles by composting and limiting consumption. We need to grow as much and hopefully more carbon than we use and put it in the ground. Even in organic gardens and more so in organic gardens that use no outside fertilizer, we must maintain fertility. The soil health is a long term resource that will quickly be depleted if we mine the nutrients without effort to replace them or allow them to grow.

This is like many things we have in life. Non-integrated burning of fuels is wasteful.  All heat should be used for multiple yields as water should be. Heat energy is quickly dissipated and lost to the sink of sky.  To that end, I believe wood can be burned for heat in winter as needed, but combined with cooking, heating water and bio-char production. There is no reason all cannot be accomplished with the same activity, pulling multiple yields which limits the consumption.  The gasses from bio-char production can be captured as alcohol and used later for fuel or returned for the initial fire. All this takes a system that we manage and maintain with dedication to the outcomes.

No comments:

Permaculture and Polyculture Consulting and Design

Permaculture and Polyculture Consulting and Design
Getting to know your property, the plants you have and those you can grow, is a fulfilling endeavor. With most I am the steward of the land. I give them good soil biology and they do the rest. If I group them in cohesive plant communities, they respond with greater yields. If I encourage the micro-organisms (Fungus and bacteria) , the roots obsorb more nutrients making a pest and disease resistant plant. A stronger plant that gives us more organic food and takes less energy.

A Ten Acre Farm Transformed to an Edible Forest Garden

A Ten Acre Farm Transformed to an Edible Forest Garden
Self Renewing Fertility, Soil Building, Water Catchment, Tea Trail Swale, Erosion Control and Native American Medicinals