Aug 28, 2009

When to add Pectin and not. Fruit jams are a staple of winter life.

Pectin and Acid Content of Common Fruits Used to Make Jelly

Group I: If not overripe, has enough natural pectin and acid for gel formation with only added sugar.
Group II: Low in natural acid or pectin, and may need addition of either acid or pectin.
Group III: Always needs added acid, pectin or both.

Group I Group II Group III
Apples, sour
Blackberries, sour
Crabapples
Cranberries
Currants
Gooseberries
Grapes (Eastern Concord)
Lemons
Loganberries
Plums (not Italian)
Quinces
Apples, ripe
Blackberries, ripe
Cherries, sour
Chokecherries
Elderberries
Grapefruit
Grape Juice, bottled
(Eastern Concord)
Grapes (California)
Loquats
Oranges
Apricots
Blueberries
Figs
Grapes (Western Concord)
Guavas
Peaches
Pears
Plums (Italian)
Raspberries
Strawberries


This document was adapted from "So Easy to Preserve", 5th ed. 2006. Bulletin 989, Cooperative Extension Service, The University of Georgia, Athens. Revised by Elizabeth L. Andress. Ph.D. and Judy A. Harrison, Ph.D., Extension Foods Specialists.

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