Mar 13, 2008

HORT 4021

It was great talking to everyone at the Permaculture annual meeting.
As you may know, I am working on my degree at the U and taking a full load of classes to jump start my reintroduction to "formal" higher learning.
I am taking three classes. DHA 3352 Symbols am Identity, PIL 3251 Temperate Climate Polycuture Design (My Ind Study) and HORT 4021 Landscape Design I.
4021 has been as challenging as it is time consuming. At least 20 hours a week in intense pencil design of residential landscapes using the a 5 step sequence.
If you are serious about permaculture design, want to develop clear design skills and can put life on hold for 15 weeks. This would be an excellent class. ( I have put all my calls on hold until June)
My last assignment, a final draft design, took 16 hours working from 8 AM to 2 AM. ( I had to work this week so I had only one day to finish the last design.) I worked using my draft design;16 hours, which came from a concept plan; 8 hours. In seven weeks our little class of ten has gone from learning the difference of 2B , HB pencils, vellum and bum wad to rendering some pretty cool plans. The design sequence is logical and much like Mollison's & Jacke's sequence. A weekend(s) workshop in landscape design with Dr, James Caulkins would be well worth the time.
Much information can been had at http://www.sustland.umn.edu/index.html
Along with the PDC, Permaculture workshops and other skill shares, I would highly recommend learning some landscape design skills and getting an old drafting table. Second only to getting things in the ground, getting them on paper is an important step and may well be your first action in making the dream a reality. I do not agree with all the residential nuances we need to take into account in class, but there are many opportunities to infuse Permaculture principles into the designs and class discussions. My last design included 5 apple trees, 39 Alpine Strawberry plants, Service Berry, Insectory Islands, dual compost bins, a rain barrel and 400 sq ft key hole garden. 31 species of plants and dozens of trees.
If I survive the semester, pass the class and the snow melts, it will be a great summer. See you in June.-

2 comments:

Karl Schmidt said...

Dan, this is excellent advice. I sat in on a Native Fruits class this semester at SDSU and also am signed up to take a Master Gardener class over nine weeks to get more knowledge and experience. The PDC I took with Bill Mollison and Geoff Lawton was excellent, but as a result of the PDC, I feel like I have some gaps in my knowledge that need to be filled.

Daniel Halsey, SouthWoods Forest Gardens said...

Epilogue:
So its now October 2011. The landscape design program at the U has been eliminated and I am holding my 5th design series to make sure these needed skills get out to designers wishing to advance in the serious design science of permaculture. The class has expanded to 5 sessions over 5 weeks. Next March I will hold the first contiguous homestead design series in Vancouver, BC. I am hoping to offer it throughout the country wherever drafting tables can be found.

Permaculture and Polyculture Consulting and Design

Permaculture and Polyculture Consulting and Design
Getting to know your property, the plants you have and those you can grow, is a fulfilling endeavor. With most I am the steward of the land. I give them good soil biology and they do the rest. If I group them in cohesive plant communities, they respond with greater yields. If I encourage the micro-organisms (Fungus and bacteria) , the roots obsorb more nutrients making a pest and disease resistant plant. A stronger plant that gives us more organic food and takes less energy.

A Ten Acre Farm Transformed to an Edible Forest Garden

A Ten Acre Farm Transformed to an Edible Forest Garden
Self Renewing Fertility, Soil Building, Water Catchment, Tea Trail Swale, Erosion Control and Native American Medicinals